A Professional Interview of Dr. Michael Arloski by David Hunnicut

Dr. Michael Arloski is CEO of Real Balance Global Wellness Services (www.realbalance.com) and dean of the Wellness Coach Training Institute. He is a licensed psychologist and professional certified coach with over 30 years of professional contribution to the field of wellness. Dr. Arloski is the author of Wellness Coaching for Lasting Lifestyle Change.

David Hunnicutt (www.WELCOA.org)  has interviewed hundreds of the most influential business and health leaders in America. Known for his ability to make complex issues easier to understand, David has a proven track record of asking the right questions and getting straight answers. As a result of his efforts, David’s expert interviews have been widely-published and read by workplace wellness practitioners across the country.

DH: When it comes to health coaching, how important is it that the coach be a good role model?

MA: It’s important from a couple of perspectives. When I think of being a good role model, I think of working on what I call a “Personal Wellness Foundation.” When I am doing workshops and training people, I always say that we as coaches do not have to look like we came off the cover of Fit magazine. Most coaches are normal human beings. We are not perfect, and we also might be trying to lose some weight or trying to improve other areas of our lives. However, the fact that a coach is engaged in that healthy effort is the most important part of being a good role model. We have a well-life vision; we are committed to healthy lifestyles and we are continually working on it.

The other part of being a good role model is having empathy for our clients. Even though I cannot really relate to someone who is 70 pounds overweight because I never had that experience in my life, I know I have felt the same kinds of feelings that person has felt. I have felt embarrassed. I have felt ashamed. I have felt frustrated. I have felt angry. That is where coaches connect. That is where we empathize. If a coach has worked on improving their own health in some way, whatever it might be, then they understand more of what the client is up against, what their reactions are to change and what they are going through.

If a coach has worked on improving their own health in some way, whatever it might be, then they understand more of what the client is up against, what their reactions are to change and what they are going through. The other part of being a good role model is having empathy for our clients. Even though I cannot really relate to someone who is 70 pounds overweight because I never had that experience in my life, I know I have felt the same kinds of feelings that person has felt. I have felt embarrassed. I have felt ashamed. I have felt frustrated. I have felt angry. That is where coaches connect. That is where we empathize. If a coach has worked on improving their own health in some way, whatever it might be, then they understand more of what the client is up against, what their reactions are to change and what they are going through